Neat!

Peter B. Reiner

Professor, Department of Psychiatry, UBC
National Core for Neuroethics

Email: pete...@ubc.ca
Phone: 604 827-5836

Web page:
National Core for Neuroethics

Education

  • PhD, University of Pennsylvania

Keywords

  • Cognitive enhancement
  • Neuroethics
  • Science and society
  • Neuroessentialism

Research Interests

Dr. Reiner is Professor and co-founder of the National Core for Neuroethics at the University of British Columbia where he is a member of the Department of Psychiatry and the Centre for Brain Health. Dr. Reiner began his research career studying the cellular and molecular physiology of the brain, with particular interests in the neurobiology of behavioural states and the molecular underpinnings of neurodegenerative disease. In 1998, Dr. Reiner became President and CEO of Active Pass Pharmaceuticals, a drug discovery company that he founded to tackle the scourge of Alzheimer's disease. Upon returning to academic life in 2004, Dr. Reiner refocused his scholarly work in the area of neuroethics, co-founding the National Core for Neuroethics with Dr. Judy Illes in 2007. Dr. Reiner has championed quantitative analysis of public attitudes towards diverse issues in neuroethics including the propriety of cognitive and moral enhancement, the contours of autonomy in the real world, and the neuroethical implications of Technologies of the Extended Mind.

View Dr. Reinerís publication on Google Scholar

Selected Publications

Fitz NS, Reiner PB, Time to expand the mind. Nature 531:S9 (2016).

Berryessa C, Chandler J, Reiner PB, Public attitudes towards legally coerced treatment of criminal behavior. Journal of Law and Biosciences doi:10.1093/jlb/lsw037 (2016).

Fitz NS, Reiner PB, The challenge of crafting policy for DIY brain stimulation. Journal of Medical Ethics 41:410-412 (2015).

Felsen G, Reiner PB, What can neuroscience contribute to the debate over nudging? Review of Philosophy and Psychology 6: 469-479 (2015).

Cabrera LY, Fitz NS, Reiner PB, Empirical support for the moral salience of the therapy-enhancement distinction in the debate over cognitive, affective and social enhancement. Neuroethics 8: 243-256 (2015).

Fitz NS, Nadler R, Manogaran P, Chong E, Reiner PB, Public attitudes towards cognitive enhancement, Neuroethics 7:173-188 (2014).


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